Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Bye-bye 2013

Dear Readers,

2013 is nearly gone and I feel the need to review it a bit regarding  books, reviews and blog.
I started the blog in April 2010 and ended the year with 130 posts. In 2011 it dropped to 99 post. It rose to 118 posts in 2012 and dropped dramatically to xx posts in 2013.

At the beginning of 2013 I posted some dreams instead of targets like reading 100 books.

- I dream to improve my sewing knowledge
That worked well. I attended some more sewing courses and worked on my own at home. 

- I dream to write and post one review per week 
I failed completely. There was a bundle of reasons.

- I dream to read all books in the Malazan Empire series within one year
I failed completely. I reread Gardens of the Moon and got stuck after 171 pages in Deadhouse Gates.
There was a bundle of reasons which I do not want to explain in detail

But there are more things that went worse.
Following authors deserve an apology because I failed to read and/or review their books:
Courtney Schafer, Rosalie Skinner, John Marco. Mark Lawrence, Geoffrey Wilson. Duncan Hamilton.


A lot of "Best of 2013" lists pop up in the book blogosphere. I decided not to add one more. I prefer to talk about a few books which impressed me.

First of all it is obvious that my taste changed a bit. 32 of the 50 books I read in 2013 are related to Steampunk, time travel, Victorian Era and crime mysteries. Beside that I read four SF books and 14 other fantasy books.

I think I impressed my love for Steampunk, Victorian and time travel again and again. Most of my decisions to read which book was base on my mood and my gut feeling.

It seams I chose the right books to read because most of them got four or five stars over at GOODREADS. Maybe I'm to generous but why should I give less stars when I really enjoyed a book. Sometimes I'm surprised when I read two star reviews over at GOODREADS saying the story was good but the cover did not hit the expectations.

A worthy end of a trilogy
I have had the pleasure to read in advance CassaStorM (September 17th, 2013) [Print ISBN-13: 978-1939844002] [E-book ISBN-13: 978-1939844019] by Alex J. Cavanaugh
which is the third and final book in the Cassa trilogy


Furthermore I have had the pleasure post my review of CassaStorM on the official publishing day.
"Congratulations Alex J. Cavanaugh. You crossed the high like the Himalaya hurdle to deliver a worthy end of your trilogy and excelled yourself. "
Thank you Alex for a great book and for your support through the whole year. You are a true friend and I hope and wish that 2014 will be a good one for you and your wife.



Two female authors new to me who surprised me
The digital world offers new opportunities for authors and readers. I'm not sure if I had discovered following author without getting a free digital copy. I talk about I Heather Blackwood.
She is the author of  The Time Corps Chronicles series which consist of three books so far. Due to information on her site there will be at least two more novels in the series: Book 4: The Sound of Wings (2014) and Book 5: A Twice Told Tale (2015).
I got a digital copy of the second book - Cat's Paw (pbl, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0988805422; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00FM7OHOQ] for free. After reading the blurb and a look at her site, I bought immediately a copy of the first book:

The Clockwork Cathedral (pbl, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0988805415; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00CZBR74O]
"Medical student Felicia Sanchez is only trying to help an injured man when she slips through a time rip and into a 19th century New Orleans, one very different than the one she knows from history books.

The only person who can get her home is Professor Seamus Connor, a former convict seeking a quiet life of obscurity. But even the “mad Irishman” knows that recreating a freak accident is next to impossible.

With the help of a local street urchin, they discover that their problems run deeper than solely getting Felicia back to her own time. The three of them must unravel the secrets of a steam engine that operates upon a scientific impossibility and the mysteries of a grand cathedral at the center of town, where clockwork automatons perform for rapt audiences.

But can a convict, a guttersnipe and an accidental time traveler prevent the destruction of a city and the death of thousands? Others are watching, and Felicia may not be the only time traveler in New Orleans." [Source]
This was a surprisingly good read. A first time travel by accident followed by the desperate tries to return home. I like the setting and the characters a lot. And there a greater things in the background and the reader gets nothing more than a few hints which lead to more questions.
I read the second book directly after the first one. With the Cat's Paw Heather Blackwood introduced one more layer into the story. It is a kind of magic.
Of course I bought a digital copy of the third book - Luna Park (digital, 2013) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B00H3RF7QA]. The blurb promise new characters and new twist and turns. I hope to read it soon.

But there is one more book by Heather Blackwood which fascinated me just a bit more. I talk about  Hounds of Autumn (digital, 2013) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B00AZMU8W8].

"It is 1890, and the windswept moors hold dark secrets. Chloe Sullivan is an amateur inventor whose holiday takes a dark turn when her friend and colleague, one of the few female mechanical experts in the British Empire, is murdered.

A black mechanical hound roams the moors, but could it have killed a woman? And what secrets are concealed within the dark family manor?

Accompanied by her naturalist husband and her clockwork cat, Chloe is determined to see her friend’s killer found.

But some secrets have a terrible cost." [Source]

This is definitely one of the best Steampunk books I read in 2013. A fascinating female main character. A lot of twists and turns. The book breathe the Victorian era and the Steampunk elements are integrated into the story. To my pleasure it lacks the romance which are part of a lot of Steampunk books.
The full review is in progress and I promise to post it in January 2014!


Within all the digital books must be a place for a real book. I discovered following cover, read the blurb and knew immediately, that is a book I will love to read in paperback format.
Darkwalker (pb, digital 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0451419989; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B00C5QULVK] by E L Tettensor.

"He used to be the best detective on the job. Until he became the hunted...

Once a legendary police inspector, Nicolas Lenoir is now a disillusioned and broken man who spends his days going through the motions and his evenings drinking away the nightmares of his past. Ten years ago, Lenoir barely escaped the grasp of the Darkwalker, a vengeful spirit who demands a terrible toll on those who have offended the dead. But the Darkwalker does not give up on his prey so easily, and Lenoir has always known his debt would come due one day.

When Lenoir is assigned to a disturbing new case, he treats the job with his usual apathy—until his best informant, a street savvy orphan, is kidnapped. Desperate to find his young friend before the worst befalls him, Lenoir will do anything catch the monster responsible for the crimes, even if it means walking willingly into the arms of his own doom…..." [Source]
It sounds Victorian with a  urban fantasy touch. Then I visited the official website, The background intensifies the impression of a Victorian background. Following information rised my expectations:
 "E L Tettensor likes her stories the way she likes her chocolate: dark, exotic, and with a hint of bitterness."
With impatience I awaited the delivery of my copy. Fortunately it did not take too long until I could dive into the book. Wow! and Wow! The story is set NOT in Victorian England!! It is an own created world with English and French sounding names. It is a world inhabited by different races. The story is a dark one and main character Nicolas Lenoir is not the lovable one whom you may inspect. Throughout the book Inspector Lenoir develops and the story delivers twists and turns. I have been mesmerised. Did I mention that  Darkwalker (pb, digital 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0451419989; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B00C5QULVK] is E L Tettensor's debut novel. I recommend to read an excerpt and an essay by following THIS LINK,



Three male authors new to me who surprised me

All three authors have a few things in common. They all write detective novels set in Victorian England.  Their main characters are far beyond to be streamlined. The all did and do a lot of research for their stories.


London in the 1840s is the stage of the Albert Newsome series by James McCreet.
From the first page the author cast a spell over me. As much as I like the book as much I can understand why people will not like it. I liked  The Incendiary's Trail (digital 2011) [Amazon Kindle ASIN: B004P1JB82] very much. I recommend to read the additional information about  the book offered by the author.
"Murder is rampant in Early Victorian London. Detective Inspector Newsome of the new Detective Force decides to recruit a recently-apprehended master criminal to help bring the culprits to justice. A polymath with a mysterious past, the man is no eager volunteer. And when the ghastly murder of conjoined twins galvanizes the city, Newsome blackmails his prisoner - Noah Dyson, as he calls himself - into working with the Force's finest: Sergeant George Williamson. Unknown to the policemen, the criminal genius behind the murder shares a dark past with their new associate. It is not justice that is on Dyson's mind, but retribution. As Williamson and Dyson together close the net, the murder-rate soars and the streets of London begin to burn. Ingeniously plotted and seething with grotesque characters, James McCreet's striking debut will grip readers from its first dark pages." [Source]
This is exactly my cup of tea, there are three more books available and I own copies of book two and three.


 With the discovery of the Furnivall and Stubbs Cases by Michael Conway Stewart I learned about  Amelia Dyer, one of the most profilic baby farm murderer in Victorian England.  Caversham Lock (digital, 2012)[AMAZON ASIN: B00A3VLV68] tells the story of from poilice side of view. The description of the atmosphere is excellent and you get a faint image about the poilce work at that time.
 "When a parcel containing a dead baby is pulled from the Thames, detectives Furnivall and Stubbs are sent to deal with the matter. They investigate at breakneck speed- it is 1896, after all, and they have all the advantages of the modern world to help them. Using microscopes, the rail network and the telegraph, they identify the culprits- a Mrs Dyer and her daughter, Polly. Even as they close in, Mrs Dyer has been back to Caversham Lock with another victim. By the time the two women are arrested there are seven little bodies in the mortuary at Reading. Each has Mrs Dyer’s trademark white dressmaker’s tape around its neck.

The case doesn't work out as planned, however, and they're forced to travel to the west country. Despite being under strict orders to return to Reading, they set an ambush on the Clifton Suspension Bridge. But a storm is rolling in, and there is another man in Bristol – a man from the Home Office sent to clean up his superiors’ mistakes." [Source]
So far Michael Conway Stewart has delivered three books and I hope there will be more in future.

The third author chose a different town for his stories. I talk about the Inspector McLevy mysteries by David Ashton which are based on the real James McLevy who was born in 1796 and died in 1875. He became Edinburgh's first detective in 1833 and served 30 years and solved 2.200 cases during this time. David Ashton knows the town and Victorian society very well. He adapted the language and use old Scottish and English words. The charactersare well done.
I got a digital copy of Shadow of the Serpent (pbl, digital, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-1846971938; Kindle Edition ASIN: B006WB2BDU] by David Ashton for free.

"Known as the father of forensics and a likely influence on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, real-life police inspector James McLevy is here reinvented by David Ashton in this the first thrilling Inspector McLevy Mystery, Shadow of the Serpent. 1880, Edinburgh, Election fever grips the city. But while the rich and educated argue about politics, in the dank wynds of the docks it's a struggle just to stay alive. When a prostitute is brutally murdered, disturbing memories from thirty years ago are stirred in McLevy who is soon lured into a murky world of politics, perversion and deception—and the shadow of the serpent." [Source]
David Ashton "fell in love with" James McLevy and this is the result so far:
- Nine McLevy radio play series  each containing of four episodes with a duration of 45 minutes each plus a 90 minute Christmas special in 2006! [Source]
Duration: 45 min each
- Four books
and more to come.
For me this is really impressive.  Fortunately I own copies of the first three books.


Two posts which convinced me to read books

The first thank you goes to The Speculative Scotsman for the absolutely convincing review of
Mayhem (digital 2013) [ASIN: B00BTEWYEG; HC ISBN-13: 978-1780871257] by Sarah Pinborough.

"A new killer is stalking the streets of London’s East End. Though newspapers have dubbed him ‘the Torso Killer’, this murderer’s work is overshadowed by the hysteria surrounding Jack the Ripper’s Whitechapel crimes.
The victims are women too, but their dismembered bodies, wrapped in rags and tied up with string, are pulled out of the Thames – and the heads are missing. The murderer likes to keep them.
Mayhem is a masterwork of narrative suspense: a supernatural thriller set in a shadowy, gaslit London, where monsters stalk the cobbled streets and hide in plain sight..." [Source]

The story is based on real events (The Thames Torso Murders of 1887 - 1889) and persons (Dr Thomas Bond).

And the perfect addendum to this review is  Mihai's interview with Sarah Pinborough over at Dark Wolf's Fantasy Reviews.


The second thank you goes to the extraordinary Dark Roasted Blend.

They surprise me nearly every week with excellent posts.
On  24th of December, Christmas Day, they delivered following post:


Until then I never read a book by Alastair Reynolds. After reading the post I could not withstand and bought a digital copy of Revelation Space (pb, digital) [ISBN-13: 978-0441009428; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B001QL5MAA] by Alastair Reynolds.
"Nine hundred thousand years ago, something annihilated the Amarantin civilization just as it was on the verge of discovering space flight. Now one scientist, Dan Sylveste, will stop at nothing to solve the Amarantin riddle before ancient history repeats itself. With no other resources at his disposal, Sylveste forges a dangerous alliance with the cyborg crew of the starship Nostalgia for Infinity. But as he closes in on the secret, a killer closes in on him. Because the Amarantin were destroyed for a reason—and if that reason is uncovered, the universe—and reality itself—could be irrecovably altered…." [Source
Today, the 31st of December 2013, I finished the book which really impressed me.  Great story and strong characters. An excellent potion of science and an unexpected end. An intimate play on the galactic stage. This is definitely a series I need to follow.






Finally Kudos and thank you to all my followers and readers who kept faith with me in 2013 despite the fact that there have not been many posts and reviews.


ENJOY READING

Saturday, December 28, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1352

Hello and welcome to issue #1352 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
This is the last issue of Edi's Weekend Wave in 2013.  When I look at the posts I did this year, I feel sad. So few reviews. I must say I disappointed myself. It is the same with reading specific books. I hope 2014 will be a better one when it comes to reviews.




ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB



  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
  2. Get a digital copy of  Hounds of Autumn by Heather Blackwood for free
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Fractal art
  2. Prison
  3. A special landscape
Movies
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. Transcendence

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idiomsQuote related to lap

The Lighthouse

I updated my list of books I read in 2013. Darkwalker has been number 48. I'm pretty sure that I will finish A Study in Silk and  until 31st of December 2013. That means I will achieve 50 books in 2013. This is not bad when I look at the time I could spent for reading.


I finished

- Darkwalker (pb, digital 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0451419989; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B00C5QULVK] by E L Tettensor.
I wrote on GOODREADS:
" What a debut novel! What an excellent start of a series!

A new world with Victorian traces. A dark mystery with detective novel elements and paranormal bits.
A main character who will not be loved by every reader. I must admit that after 50 pages I thought I will not like him but there is so much character development...

As one can read on the author's site, she likes her stories the way she likes her chocolate: dark, exotic, and with a hint of bitterness.

To be honest, that is exactly what you get.

Looking forward to read more books starring Nicolas Lenoir."




I'm


- 423 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.

- 356 pages in Revelation Space (pb, digital) [ISBN-13: 978-0441009428; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B001QL5MAA] by Alastair Reynolds.
My first book and I'm impressed. It was hard for me to put down the book. I will definitely continue to read the series

No progress


- 241 pages in the Amelia Peabody's Murder Mystery Omnibus (digital, pb, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B007PRZJAW] by Elizabeth Peters.


- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson




 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another

On 24th of December I talked about the famous Revelation Space series by Alastair Reynolds.  I could not resist and bought a digital copy of the first book in the series:

Revelation Space (pb, digital) [ISBN-13: 978-0441009428; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B001QL5MAA] by Alastair Reynolds.
"Nine hundred thousand years ago, something annihilated the Amarantin civilization just as it was on the verge of discovering space flight. Now one scientist, Dan Sylveste, will stop at nothing to solve the Amarantin riddle before ancient history repeats itself. With no other resources at his disposal, Sylveste forges a dangerous alliance with the cyborg crew of the starship Nostalgia for Infinity. But as he closes in on the secret, a killer closes in on him. Because the Amarantin were destroyed for a reason—and if that reason is uncovered, the universe—and reality itself—could be irrecovably altered…." [Source
I'm so happy that I bought a copy and started to read. I spent most of the day reading the book. I nearly forgot to eat. Excellent SF stuff.





Is it a good idea when an author use characters from other authors? From my point of view it always depends on the result. I never read Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. I know the book from TV and film adaptions. So the Artful Dodger is not unknown to me. What about you? Following scene shows Following scene give you an impression. Actor Jack Wild was well known for his Artful Dodger performance. Just have a look at following scene:

But what happened to the Artful Dodger after the events described in Oliver Twist?
Author James Benmore offers an answer in his debut novel  Dodger (pb, digital) [ISBN-13: 978-1780874678; Kindle Edition ASIN:   B00ANJW3P8] .
"London, 1850s.

After five years in an Australian penal colony, the Artful Dodger returns to London in search of a hidden fortune. Unaware of the fate that befell Twist, Fagin and Sikes, Dodger revisits the criminal underworld of Dickensian London to seek out his old comrades, any of whom might possess the key to the treasure.

He finds the city a changed place from his youth: with law and order upheld by a new police force, Fagin gone to the gallows, his old gang scattered and danger around every corner." [Source]
I'm fascinated by Victorian London. When I saw the cover and read the blurb, I was hooked. Now I own a digital copy.

Maybe, maybe, maybe, this will be the first book to start with in 2014 .........
 



Get a digital copy of  Hounds of Autumn by Heather Blackwood for free
Last week I told you how much I liked
- Hounds of Autumn (digital, 2013) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B00AZMU8W8] by Heather Blackwood
"It is 1890, and the windswept moors hold dark secrets. Chloe Sullivan is an amateur inventor whose holiday takes a dark turn when her friend and colleague, one of the few female mechanical experts in the British Empire, is murdered.

A black mechanical hound roams the moors, but could it have killed a woman? And what secrets are concealed within the dark family manor?

Accompanied by her naturalist husband and her clockwork cat, Chloe is determined to see her friend’s killer found.

But some secrets have a terrible cost." [Source]

I wrote on GOODREADS:
"I like steampunk. I like the Victorian era. I like mysteries.

This was a surprising good read. It was exactly my cup of tea.

A fascinating female main character. A lot of twists and turns. The book breathe the Victorian era and the steampunk elements are integrated into the story.

I hope and wish that Heather Blackwood will write more steampunk mysteries.
"

Now you can get a digital copy of Hounds of Autumn for free until 31st of December 2013 over at


No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...



Fractal art
is something fascinating. The WebUrbanist presents the combination of buildings and fractal art. Enjoy following post:
Architectural Kaleidoscopes: Buildings Spun into Fractal Art


Prison
What would be English history without prisons? One of them is Newgate prison which was in use for over 700 years.  There is an informative post over at English Historical Fction Authors.
Have a look at Newgate Prison by Evelyn Tidman


A special landscape
We all know that you can do a lot if things with books beside reading. There is one example over at the WebUrbanist which is impressive. Have a look at
Encyclopedic Landscape: Artist Carves 24-Volume Book Set


That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

Johnny Depp is one of my favorite actors. So I look forward to his appearance in the 2014 SF movie Transcendence where a fatally ill scientist transfer his character into a computer.





That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

I'm not sure if I posted the following quote before. Nevertheless I can the truth of the quote based on daily experience ....


"If a dog jumps in your lap, it is because he is fond of you; but if a cat does the same thing, it is because your lap is warmer.

Alfred North Whitehead, English philosopher and mathematician, 1861 - 1947

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Great Giveaway over at THE BOOK SMUGGLERS

Dear Readers,

would you like to win a digital device in form of a tablet for reading digital books and more?

Then I have a recommendation for you.
There is a world wide opened giveaway running until Wednesday, January 1, 2014.

The Prize
Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8.0
1 Amazon Gift Card ($50)
  

Where?
 

Smugglivus 2013 Holiday Giveaway: Samsung Galaxy Tablet

over at 

The Book Smugglers

 

Good Luck!

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Merry Christmas 2013

Dear Readers,

I'm so happy to have some days off which I enjoy a lot. A time of joy, pleasure and relaxation lies ahead. A time to spend in peace with the ones you love. A time full of joy and excitement about all the books you will get as Christmas gifts.

It is no secret that I admire the extraordinary Dark Roasted Blend.

They surprise me nearly every week with excellent posts. And today - 24th of December, Christmas Day - they posted a gift for all people who are interested in EPIC SPACE FICTION or who want to discover the world of EPIC SPACE FICTION. Go and have a look at


I admit that I never read a book by Alastair Reynolds so far. But that may change after I read the mentioned post.

The famous Revelation Space series started in 2000 with
Revelatin Space (pb, digital) [ISBN-13: 978-0441009428; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B001QL5MAA] by Alastair Reynolds.


"Nine hundred thousand years ago, something annihilated the Amarantin civilization just as it was on the verge of discovering space flight. Now one scientist, Dan Sylveste, will stop at nothing to solve the Amarantin riddle before ancient history repeats itself. With no other resources at his disposal, Sylveste forges a dangerous alliance with the cyborg crew of the starship Nostalgia for Infinity. But as he closes in on the secret, a killer closes in on him. Because the Amarantin were destroyed for a reason—and if that reason is uncovered, the universe—and reality itself—could be irrecovably altered…." [Source]

 Now I wish you and your dear and near ones a
WONDERFUL CHRISTMAS 2013 !


Saturday, December 21, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1351

Hello and welcome to issue #1351 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
Finally I reached my days off. Will return to work beginning of 2014. Now I work on a Christmas gift in form of a review. I want to use my free days to relax and to spend time for reading, reviewing and sewing. There so many posts I missed to read. It will take time to reduce the number of unread posts. I think the most important thing for me is to relax and to think about what I would like to do with the blog in 2014.
I must say The Desolation of Smaug was not bad. But I missed what I describe for myself as "magic moments" which make the The Lord of the Rings trilogy still the better movies set in Middle-earth.



ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB


  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Some colorful sweets for Christmas
  2. LEGO I
  3. LEGO II
Movies
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. Land of Giants

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idiomsQuote related to poetry

The Lighthouse

I does not happen that often that I read three books from one author within one month. Author Heather Blackwood impressed me with her time travel series and with her first Steampunk novel. Sti7 days left until the end of 2013. So far I managed to read 45 books. It seems to achieve the mark of 50 books is out of reach. I hope 2014 will be a better year when it comes to reading.
Nevertheless I'm happy that I could finish one more book last week.

I finished

- Hounds of Autumn (digital, 2013) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B00AZMU8W8] by Heather Blackwood
"It is 1890, and the windswept moors hold dark secrets. Chloe Sullivan is an amateur inventor whose holiday takes a dark turn when her friend and colleague, one of the few female mechanical experts in the British Empire, is murdered.

A black mechanical hound roams the moors, but could it have killed a woman? And what secrets are concealed within the dark family manor?

Accompanied by her naturalist husband and her clockwork cat, Chloe is determined to see her friend’s killer found.

But some secrets have a terrible cost." [Source]

I wrote on GOODREADS:
"I like steampunk. I like the Victorian era. I like mysteries.

This was a surprising good read. It was exactly my cup of tea.

A fascinating female main character. A lot of twists and turns. The book breathe the Victorian era and the steampunk elements are integrated into the story.

I hope and wish that Heather Blackwood will write more steampunk mysteries.
"


I'm

- 55 pages Darkwalker (pb, digital 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0451419989; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B00C5QULVK] by E L Tettensor.
Again I followed my gut feeling and started to read this book. Surprisingly there are neither Steampunk elements nor the story is set in Victorian England. But the first 50 pages were really promising. The main character Nicolas Lenoir is most interesting and I know I will not really like him because his behaviour .... No, I won't tell you. Two green eyes in the dark, absinthe to forget ....

- 361 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.


No progress


- 241 pages in the Amelia Peabody's Murder Mystery Omnibus (digital, pb, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B007PRZJAW] by Elizabeth Peters.


- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson




 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another

I have been really lucky in the past week because I could get a digital copy of Nor will he sleep (pb, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-1846972515; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00EU9XICO] by David Ashton for 99 Euro Cent!!
This is the fourth book in the series
"The streets of 1887 Edinburgh seethe with youthful anarchy as two rival gangs of students, Scarlet Runners and White Devils, try to outdo each other in wild exploits. After a pitched battle between them, an old woman is found savagely battered to death in Leith Harbour. Enter Inspector James McLevy, a little more grizzled, but unchanging in his fierce desire to mete out justice. As the inspector delves further he meets up with one Robert Louis Stevenson, author of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, in the city to bury his recently deceased father." [Source]
In the meantime I found out that there are also two short stories available.
At the moment I do not have any plans to buy them. Normally I prefer to read full novels.







No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

Some colorful sweets for Christmas
I like sweets and I know that they are not good for my hips. So I try to enjoy them virtually.
I found a kind of Christmas gift for me over at the WebUrbanist. Enjoy their post


LEGO I

If you share your home with tons of LEGO bricks and you do not know what to do with them and you dream of a new car, then you should follow THIS LINK.

LEGO II

If you share your home with tons of LEGO bricks and you do not know what to do with them and you live Middle-earth, then you should follow THIS LINK.



That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

Today I share with you the promotion for a TV series. I must say, I like it.
"This short is a first look into the world of LAND OF GIANTS, where western, martial arts and giant creatures meet in a post-apocalyptic future.

After an apocalyptic storm reduced the world to ruins, Giants appeared, to punish those who would ever again lay their hands on the magic called "Electricity".
A long time ago Crutch (Mathis Landwehr) challenged the Gigants anger. His destroyed knee won't let him forget the day, they took everything from him.
So he ventured out to hunt and kill them..." [Source]


That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

Time for poetry ....


"I have nothing to say, and I am saying it, and that is poetry.

John Cage, US composer (1912 - 1992)

Saturday, December 14, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1350

Hello and welcome to issue #1350 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
Ten days to go until Christmas Eve. Instead of snow we get fog and rain. To look out of the window is disencouraging. Fortunately I found a lot of interesting things while searching material for this post.  I look forward to the evening because my wife and I will go to cinema and watch ....... The Desolation of Smaug!!




ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB




  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Book Covers
  2. Well Known and Unknown
  3. Fans and Admirers
  4. A Bridge Like No Other
Movies
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. Father and Sun
  2. The Author
  3. The Immortal

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idiomsQuote related to zoo

The Lighthouse

17 days left until the end of 2013. So far I managed to read 45 books. It seems to achieve the mark of 50 books is out of reach. I hope 2014 will be a better year when it comes to reading.
Nevertheless I'm happy that I could finish one more book last week.

I finished

- Cat's Paw (pbl, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0988805422; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00FM7OHOQ] by Heather Blackwood
Iwrote on GOODREADS:
" Cat's Paw continues the story from The Clockwork Cathedral and it is an excellent second book in the series.
A lot of time travels, character development, a touch of magic and an end with more open questions.

Fortunately book three - Luna Park - is available and I own a copy :-) ...."






No progress

- 286 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.


- 241 pages in the Amelia Peabody's Murder Mystery Omnibus (digital, pb, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B007PRZJAW] by Elizabeth Peters.


- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson




 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another


It still happens. Isee a cover, read a blurb and know immediately that I must have a copy, a paper copy. This was the case when I discovered Darkwalker (pb, digital 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0451419989; Kindle Edition ASIN:  B00C5QULVK] by E L Tettensor.

"He used to be the best detective on the job. Until he became the hunted...

Once a legendary police inspector, Nicolas Lenoir is now a disillusioned and broken man who spends his days going through the motions and his evenings drinking away the nightmares of his past. Ten years ago, Lenoir barely escaped the grasp of the Darkwalker, a vengeful spirit who demands a terrible toll on those who have offended the dead. But the Darkwalker does not give up on his prey so easily, and Lenoir has always known his debt would come due one day.

When Lenoir is assigned to a disturbing new case, he treats the job with his usual apathy—until his best informant, a street savvy orphan, is kidnapped. Desperate to find his young friend before the worst befalls him, Lenoir will do anything catch the monster responsible for the crimes, even if it means walking willingly into the arms of his own doom…..." [Source]

Darkwalker is the first book in the Nicolas Lenoir series. Discover the world of E L Tettensor and Nicolas Lenoir by visiting the official website, by reading and excerpt and an essay by following THIS LINK, by reading the interview over at The Bibliosanctum - ATTENTION!! There is a giveaway open to US and Canadian residents ending on 16th of December 2013 attached to the interview.
The blog mentioned on the back of the book - erintettensor.blogspot.com - is no more longer valid.




No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

Book Covers
Even I try to select books I want to read based on blurbs, book descriptions and reviews, I can't deny that from time to time it is purely the cover why I wan to get a book. The cover has definitely an impact on the decision whether people buy a book or not. There is an excellent post which underline the importance of a cover. Just read



Well Known and Unknown

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is the well known creator of the immortal Sherlock Holmes. But do you know that he also wrote historical fiction?
Head over to Alt Hist: Historical Fiction and Alternate History and read



Fans and Admirers
There are Sherlock Holmes fans all over the world. Some admirer the detective and his author in secret. There are also many, many Sherlock Holmes Societies.  And of course there are sites dedicated to Sherlock Holmes.
In the past days I discovered a Hungarian site which I really appreciate:
sherlockian-sherlock.com


A Bridge Like No Other
We all know famous bridges like the Golden Gate Bridge or the Tower Bridge which has a high-level walkway. Do you know extraordinary pedestrian bridges? I know now one since I headed over to the WebUrbanist and read following post:


That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

I can't tell you how happy I am because I discovered following video because it is something reall special.  In cas you don't know, this interview from 1927 is the only existing filmed interview with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  I watch it again and again and listen to the voice of the creator of Sherlock Holmes.



The youngest son of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - Adrian Malcolm Conan Doyle (19th November 1910 - 3rd June 1970) founded the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Foundation in Switzerland in 1965.


I found an interview with Adrian Malcolm Conan Doyle which offers a lot information from family point of view.

Adrian Conan Doyle Interview (Part 1/3)

Adrian Conan Doyle Interview (Part 2/3)

Adrian Conan Doyle Interview (Part 3/3)


The following five part documentation offers more about the life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and relations to his  most famous hero. The embedding function as been disabled. So you have to follow the links to watch the videos.

Sherlock Holmes (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) 1 of 5


Sherlock Holmes (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) 2 of 5


Sherlock Holmes (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) 3 of 5


Sherlock Holmes (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) 4 of 5


Sherlock Holmes (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) 5 of 5


There are a lot of documentations about Sherlock Holmes available. I must say that I like the following one which is enlightening and entertaining.

Elementary My Dear Viewer (Sherlock Holmes documentary)


That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

Last week I talked about my disappointment resulted from the disimprovement of some sources. It seems I was not the only one. Some of the changes have been removed and now I can use them again.

Following quote fits to the boo I finished today. Now I need to find out which is the right medicine for my soul.....


"Zoo: An excellent place to study the habits of human beings.

Evan Esar, American Humorist (1899 - 1995)
You might also like:

Saturday, December 07, 2013

Edi's Weekend Wave issue #1349

Hello and welcome to issue #1349 of Edi's Weekend Wave.
I "survived" another week. Nevertheless there have been three things which I enjoyed. I discovered a new time travel series, I finished two books and my wife and I went shopping to a button shop. So many gorgeous buttons ..... 



ENJOY READING ....

Edi's Guidepost

The Lighthouse
News and information straight from the horse's mouth by Lighthouse keeper ediFanoB



  1. Reading progress 
Books
The latest report from our shelf shop net correspondent Bona
  1. New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another 
Blogosphere
Messages from the depths of the blogosphere by spheronaut Bona Fide
  1. Book Covers
  2. Special Kind of Bingo
  3. Cinerama
Remote control junkie Fide and his zapping highlights
  1. More Hobbit Stuff

Quotes
The member of the house of quotes and a quote himself the Keeper of the minutes ( we call him Kotm) fished for you
  1. German proverbs, sayings and idiomsQuote related to memory

The Lighthouse

The best day for reading is Sunday. But with spending a few hours on one day it is impossible to achieve a proper progress. At least I continued to read one of my long term readings and I put my nose in a book I discovered last week. This is not my month due to two facts: Depressing weather and exhausting work. I was so happy that I finished a book last Sunday and wanted to spend more time for reading. I ended up with 227 pages in six days!!! Really disappointing.

I finished

- Shadow of the Serpent (pbl, digital, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-1846971938; Kindle Edition ASIN: B006WB2BDU] by David Ashton
I wrote on GOODREADS:
"David Ashton is an excellent author. I love his writing. Inspector McLevy is a great character. The description of Edinburgh is awesome and the use of old words and Scottish words (I admit I had to use an online Scottish dictionary several times) is the cherry on the cake when it comes to authencity.
After reading the firts book in the series I understand why the original Inspector McLevy may have been an inspiration for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle."



- The Clockwork Cathedral (pbl, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0988805415; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00CZBR74O] by Heather Blackwood
I wrote on GOODREADS:
"I really like time travel stories. This one was a real surprise because I found an unexpected gem.
It is really different compared to time travel books I read. Nothing like go back in time to save the world. It starts with a simple accident and the desperate tries to return to the time where the story started. But there is much more ....
There is a real end and a cliffhanger at the same time.
This is the first book in a series and I can't wait to read the other two available books."



I'm

- 56 pages in Cat's Paw (pbl, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0988805422; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00FM7OHOQ] by Heather Blackwood



No progress

- 286 pages in A Study in Silk (digital, pb, September 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0345537188; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00C4BA48G] by Emma Jane Holloway.


- 241 pages in the Amelia Peabody's Murder Mystery Omnibus (digital, pb, 2012) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B007PRZJAW] by Elizabeth Peters.


- 98 pages in The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime (digital 2011) [ Kindle Edition ASIN: B004FPYX72] by Judith Flanders.

- 172 pages in the Emperor of Thorns (pb, August 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0007439058] by Mark Lawrence,


- 175 pages in Deadhouse Gates (pb, 2006; first published in 2000) [ISBN-13: 978-0765348791] by Steven Erikson




 Enjoy your weekend ....



Books

Dear readers, I'm the one to tell you about books - only books? What about novellas and other stuff? My name is Bona. I scour shelves, shops and the net for books. If you call me a book whore I would not gainsay you. But be aware I have my own, sometimes elusive taste.

New books on my shelf/reader or when one book leads to another


The free digital books offer over at Amazon ist tempting. I do not deny that I check offers more or less regularly. So far I found some interesting books from authors I never heard about before.
That is eaxctly the point when it comes to a time travel series new to me. I got the second books for free. After having a look at the site of the author, I bought a copy of the first book in the series. As I enjoyed it so much I bought a copy of the third book.
I talk about Heather Blackwood and her The Time Corps Chronicles series.

The Clockwork Cathedral (pbl, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0988805415; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00CZBR74O] by Heather Blackwood
"Medical student Felicia Sanchez is only trying to help an injured man when she slips through a time rip and into a 19th century New Orleans, one very different than the one she knows from history books.

The only person who can get her home is Professor Seamus Connor, a former convict seeking a quiet life of obscurity. But even the “mad Irishman” knows that recreating a freak accident is next to impossible.

With the help of a local street urchin, they discover that their problems run deeper than solely getting Felicia back to her own time. The three of them must unravel the secrets of a steam engine that operates upon a scientific impossibility and the mysteries of a grand cathedral at the center of town, where clockwork automatons perform for rapt audiences.

But can a convict, a guttersnipe and an accidental time traveler prevent the destruction of a city and the death of thousands? Others are watching, and Felicia may not be the only time traveler in New Orleans." [Source]

Cat's Paw (pbl, digital, 2013) [ISBN-13: 978-0988805422; Kindle Edition ASIN: B00FM7OHOQ] by Heather Blackwood
"Time Travelers aren’t born. They’re made.

Determined to return a twenty-first-century woman to her own world, Professor Seamus Connor has spent six long years—since 1857—in his laboratory without success. Desperate to help her, he will do anything…even team up with his worst enemy.

In a country torn apart by the Civil War, Seamus’s young ward, Hazel, tries to make a life for herself in New Orleans. She has the chance at a happy, stable life, but a promise from a man from the future proves too tempting to resist.

Long before he worked with the Time Corps, Neil Grey had another job, one that used all his cunning, strength and ingenuity. It was good work, or so he always believed. But the more he learns, the more he discovers that he might be a cat’s paw: a tool used by another.

Together, they travel from a world ruled by science and reason into one of bizarre impossibilities. Inhabited by mythical ships and people who are not what they appear to be, in this world the fantastical is real and reality is never what it seems." [Source]

Luna Park (digital, 2013) [Kindle Edition ASIN: B00H3RF7QA] by Heather Blackwood
"Astrid dreams of escaping a dull job at the California boardwalk and moving to New York for art school. But after a series of unexplainable events, she is forced into a conflict spanning multiple worlds. Her fate is tied to Yukiko, an odd woman with a puzzling abilities and dubious motives. Together, they must discover the secrets of the borderland between reality and illusion, our world and others.

Meanwhile, Astrid’s cousin Elliot has troubles of his own. One day, he’ll be Neil Grey’s partner in the Time Corps. But for now, he’s a young surfer with strange dreams, ones that could predict time slips and even the future.

The Time Corps aren’t the only ones who can create doors between worlds. And doors can open both ways." [Source]




As I enjoyed Shadow of the Serpent (pbl, digital, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-1846971938; Kindle Edition ASIN: B006WB2BDU] by David Ashton so much, I could not withstand to buy digital copies of two more books in the series.

Fall from Grace (pb, digital, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-1846970504; Kindle Edition ASIN: B006WB2B7Q] by David Ashton
"Number two – Fall from Grace – a darker affair. Loss of reputation, a dangerous and dissatisfied wife, a homo-erotically inclined cold-blooded murderer, McLevy’s past in the shape of his mother’s suicide and insanity back to haunt him; all led to a wild night-storm and the Tay Bridge disaster. The fall out from that terrible accident permeates the rest of the novel and though there is a deal of McLevy’s black wit some additional humour comes in the shape of one William McGonagall – I am very fond of Mister McGonagall – he sacrificed his whole life to produce some of the worst poetry the world has ever seen and his dreadful verse is a macabre counterpoint as all these strands collide. McLevy ends up in the ocean with a desperate man for company. And the inspector cannot swim." [Source]




A Trick of the Light (pb, digital, 2011) [ISBN-13: 978-1846970504; Kindle Edition ASIN: B006WB2B7Q] by David Ashton
"Third up – Trick of the Light – covers mesmerism and the American Civil War. A satanic monster bent upon revenge stalks the Edinburgh rooftops to avenge past treachery and McLevy once more shakes hands with death. Arthur Conan Doyle makes appearance as unpaid assistant and by dint of a mighty arm and hard cricket ball, earns the inspector’s thanks. Yet at the end, a beautiful woman dies for nothing, Doyle’s heart is broken and James McLevy has deep and dark secrets that he keeps to himself. Not unlike a writer. Writing books almost kills me. But not quite. At the back of my head, a burly figure waits in the darkness ready to investigate should I be untimely slain by lethal fiction. My hero." [Source]











No more today, see you next week ......



Blogosphere


Hey, I'm Bona Fide. I just came back from my last foray through the blogosphere. What can you expect from me? I tell you: Everything from Art to Fart as long as there is any faint connection to books. And here is some honey from the beehive blogosphere...

Book Covers
Even I try to select books I want to read based on blurbs, book descriptions and reviews, I can't deny that from time to time it is purely the cover why I wan to get a book. The cover has definitely an impact on the decision whether people buy a book or not. There is an excellent post which underline the importance of a cover. Just read



A special Kind of Bingo
Like me you like books and like me you know thiss sometimes hidden but mostly obvious wish to classify books into genres and subgenres. For me it seems that more and more publishers and authors try to add the flag "Steampunk" to their books. Of course there are definitions of Steampunk. But which criteria classify a book as a Steampunk book?
Help is on the way over at Fantasy Faction in form of following post which I recommend to read



Cinerama
I assume you know the articles about the next big thing. So I was curious to read the following post over at Dark Roasted Blend
It is another excellent post and should be of interest for anyone who goes to cinema or watch TV.


That's it for today. Come back next week for more ......


Movies
Hey, it's me Fide. I'm a remote control professional. I'm that fast that I can watch two movies at the same time.

Only a few days left until I can see parts of the following video on a big screen ....
Anticipation is growing from day to day ....


That's all for today. See you next time....


Quotes

I 'm the Keeper of the minutes. But I don't mind when you call me Kotm. No, no. I don't explain to you how to pronounce.

Last week I talked about my disappointment resulted from the disimprovement of some sources. It seems I was not the only one. Some of the changes have been removed and now I can use them again.

Following quote fits to the boo I finished today. Now I need to find out which is the right medicine for my soul.....


"Creditors have better memories than debtors.

Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, (1706 - 1790)
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